Creative Hiatus

Hello again. I’m back. After nearly three weeks of weblogging silence, some minor guilt tripping and a few false starts, I’ve found the right mix of conditions to write again. I’m a perfect example of today’s topic: creative hiatus.

Most of us have been socially educated to think that, in order to be good, we must be productive. And, by productive, we mean 40 hours a week plus overtime and weekends, plus extracurricular moments spent complaining, worrying, recovering from or, if you’re the type, boasting about what we do.

Doesn’t that sound fun?

Following this rationale, if you’re not being productive, then you don’t deserve to enjoy the benefits of life. Instead, you need to find a way to get productive. Pronto!

So, this wonderful cultural programming is a part of most of us Westerners and of the systems we create. It’s certainly something that has defined me for as far back as I can remember.

As an artist, demanding productivity from yourself can be suicide. We all need to sleep at night, don’t we? Just think of how many marvelous things we could do if we could skip sleeping? But how would you feel?

We all need rest. Thus, it follows that creative people need rest, too. Dough needs time to rise before it can become bread. Wine needs time to age, to sit still and wait until it’s ripened to it’s unique best. The secret is to wait, wait…wait……………………………………………………………………………………………………….
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………………………………………wait…

It is in the waiting that ideas can find space to evolve. Even though you may not be consciously producing something, an underlying process is at work.

You don’t need to control it.

It just happens.

So, let it happen. Let yourself rest. Take a creative hiatus from being productive and enjoy yourself, guilt free!

Your creative work will emerge when you’re ready.